May 2011

Morgan Glennon

lwfield: 

Legendary Women

firstname: 

Morgan

lastname: 

Glennon

emailfield: 

mglennon@legendarywomen.org

othersite: 

http://writingmorgan.tumblr.com/
Advisor to the Board

Morgan Glennon is a working journalist who researches and performs interviews with a variety of newsmakers. She is also a freelance writer specializing in television and entertainment coverage. Her writing can be found at her blog Morgan Writes. She believes that the portrayal of women in the media is important for guiding the dreams and careers paths of future generations of young women.

Elizabeth De Razzo

lwfield: 

Legendary Women

firstname: 

Elizabeth

lastname: 

De Razzo

othersite: 

http://www.ibginc.org/
Co-founder, Board Member Emeritus

ELIZABETH DE RAZZO is a native of Laredo, Texas, she always knew she wanted to be a performer from an early age. After moving to Los Angeles in her late teens, Elizabeth began pursuing her career in earnest, dividing her time between theater and the small screen. Elizabeth was able to incorporate her first love, singing, in her co-starring role as Estella in the stage production of Real Women Have Curves: The Musical.

Margaret J.B. Bates

lwfield: 

Legendary Women

firstname: 

Margaret

lastname: 

Bates

emailfield: 

mbates@legendarywomen.org
Co-Founder, President/Treasurer

Margaret Bates majored in developmental psychology at Duke University and then continued her studies toward a Ph.D. with an emphasis on autism intervention at The University of Alabama at Birmingham. However, a lifetime of studying Spanish and an interest in serving the growing immigrant community prompted her to capitalize on her minor. She returned to school for interpreting and now has a certificate in medical Spanish interpretations.

Tina Fey and Feminism

Say the name Tina Fey and you conjure up a barrage of famous cultural images: Mean Girls, 30 Rock, brownie husbands, “I can see Russia from my house”. Something that has always marked Tina Fey’s writing is the ability to tell stories about women that we don’t always hear in popular culture. Fey doesn’t shy away from portraying women not as saints or love interests, but as real people. And occasionally, gross people.